#TreatyEdCamp 2.0

It is back! Treaty Ed Camp 2.0 is happening October 1, 2016 from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm! There is an optional pipe ceremony at 7:00 am!

#TreatyEdCamp 2.0 is the free personal and professional development event sponsored and organized by UR S.T.A.R.S. Based loosely on the EdCamp model, this is PD organized for teachers by teachers, with a particular focus on the implementation of Treaty Education in classrooms as well as on the role of schools and educators in the work of reconciliation.

The day will be structured around three big questions:  What does Treaty Education mean; how do we do it; and what does reconciliation look like in our schools, classrooms, and communities?  We are bringing together some awesome teachers who are doing Treaty Education in their classrooms to share their experiences, and we ask that you come with an open mind and prepared to share and discuss your own experiences.  If you are interested in presenting, please email us at starsregina@gmail.com!

Everyone will leave this event with new resources, a better understanding of Treaty Education in practice, a network of people to rely on for support, and a greater understanding of the significance of Treaty to our work as educators and to the process of reconciliation.

This year, we’re offering the option to purchase a lunch for $5.00. Lunch includes soup, bannock, and a drink. Unfortunately, we are unable to provide a vegetarian or gluten free option. In order to ensure that we have enough food, lunch must be purchased in advance through Eventbrite, and sales of lunch tickets will be closed on September 19th. Please note that if you choose not to purchase lunch, TreatyEdCamp tickets are free (but we do ask that you sign up through Eventbrite so that we have an idea of numbers!).

 

“S0, Why Are You Here?”

As I prepare for an exciting new semester, I also prepare for an exciting new leadership role with UR S.T.A.R.S. A group dedicated to anti-racist/oppressive education; a group of inspiring, influential, and incredible colleagues and faculty members from the University of Regina. As I began introducing myself to the Executive Director role I will share with Cassandra Hepworth, I was asked about my journey here: How did you end up here? Why did you end up here?

I believe Indigenous peoples of Canada should not have to mentally prepare how to act around Caucasians; I believe we should be able to share smiles, handshakes, and equal education and career opportunities. I believe all individuals should be able to apply to any educational opportunity-there should be no exceptions made to the individuals with autism. I believe the stigma surrounding mental health needs to be removed; no one deserves to be labeled “crazy” or “pathetic” because they are fighting an invisible illness. I believe new Canadians should be welcomed with open arms, and not expected to meet the arbitrary “Canadian” list of values defined by the same government who maintain “The Indian Act.

It is the work UR S.T.A.R.S. does for these oppressed groups in society that drew me to join and work, and now lead, alongside great colleagues to provide resources, professional development opportunities ,and open panel discussions to make these topics less awkward and to influence others to provide anti-racist/oppressive education.

My obvious passion for education, an inclusive learning environment and society provided a strong foundation to my path. As my awareness of our history and relationships with First Nations peoples increased, so did my interest in learning and working to share this important information- sharing these truths to work towards reconciliation. The wise words “once you see it, you can’t un-see it” stuck with me, and I believe this is information and learning that must be seen.

Furthermore, as a friend it is an important component of my relationships. I do this work as the work of a friend. I work towards reconciliation and and inclusive society with the constant thought of my friends who, with their ancestors, have fought for this for hundreds of years; my friend whose transgendered child was terrified to share who he really is; my friends and family who refuse to be labeled “crazy” so they silently deal with anxiety and depression.

There is a strong personal element behind every step I take; these personal relationships continue to push me through the roughest terrain on the journey. While I know my steps are small, and I will be wrong and make mistakes, “if it is worth doing badly, it’s worth doing.” If our message positively affects one person out of 1000, that is one more person taking our message to 1000 others.

There will no doubt be difficult days with resistance and frustrations; it is in these moments we must remember to continue to learn. I look forward to building and forming many new relationships, as well as sharing many opportunities to learn and grow with Cassandra, the UR S.T.A.R.S. team, and each and every one of you!